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ForeignAssistance.gov was updated on October 19, 2018. Click here to explore the update details.

U.S. Agency for International Development

Agency Overview

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is the U.S. government’s primary development agency, working in more than 100 developing countries. USAID’s mission is to partner to end extreme poverty and promote resilient, democratic societies while advancing our security and prosperity. The Agency accelerates human progress in developing countries by:

  • Promoting broadly shared economic prosperity;
  • Strengthening democracy and good governance and protecting human rights;
  • Improving global health,
  • Advancing food security and agriculture;
  • Improving environmental sustainability;
  • Furthering education; and
  • Helping societies prevent and recover from conflicts and providing humanitarian assistance in the wake of natural and man-made disasters.

Established in 1961, USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. It is headed by an Administrator appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

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U.S. Agency for International Development Data

U.S. government agencies are adding data to ForeignAssistance.gov quarterly to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016. Each agency is required by law to report at FY2015 as the minimum base year.

Planned Funding By Fiscal Year | DoS and USAID

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Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | USAID

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Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | USAID

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Transaction Data | USAID

Transaction data represents every individual financial record in an agency’s accounting system for program work with implementing partners and administrative expenses. Transaction data is the most granular form of financial data. Each data record - or financial transaction - contains qualitative data fields, including descriptive titles, vendor names, and location, along with the financial data. Thus, transaction data is called Disaggregated data as it disaggregates financial data into its most basic form.

The data shown above in the planned, obligated, and spent tabs represents transaction data aggregated at a higher level of analysis (by country and sector only), thus this data is called Aggregated data.

The table below displays every applicable award within each agency’s accounting system. An award may consist of multiple financial transactions. In these instances, the table displays the award’s aggregated sum of its individual transactions. Data from the table can be downloaded by selecting each individual award. The downloadable report disaggregates award data into individual transactions. If an award has multiple transactions, the downloadable report will generate lines of data for each transaction.

For additional information related to data definitions and classifications, please refer to the Glossary of Terms or the FAQs.

This data set will continue to be updated in accordance with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin 12-01.

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Award IDAward TitleImplementing Org.ObligatedSpent

Frequently Asked Questions | USAID

What is USAID?

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is an independent federal government agency whose mission is to advance broad-based economic growth, democracy and human progress around the world.

Since its inception in 1961, USAID has carried out U.S. foreign policy by promoting broad-scale human progress in the developing world, at the same time it expands stable, free societies, creates markets and trade partners for the United States, and fosters good will abroad.

For more information see USAID's Who We Are.

When was USAID created?

Following the success of the reconstruction of Europe after World War II through the Marshall Plan and the Truman Administration's Point Four Program -- the 1950 program to engage in technically-based international economic development -- President John F. Kennedy signed the Foreign Assistance Act into law in 1961 and USAID was created by executive order. Since that time, USAID has been the principal U.S. agency to extend assistance to countries recovering from disaster, trying to escape poverty, and engaging in democratic reforms.

Please visit USAID History for more information.

Why are the Department of State and USAID’s budget planning figures the same?

The Department of State and USAID’s foreign assistance budgets are requested and appropriated jointly. The funds for the Department of State and USAID are not disaggregated at the request stage of the funding process. Agency- specific data for the Department of State and USAID will be available at the obligated and spent phases of the funding process, and for USAID are available at Where Does USAID’s Money Go? and Foreign Assistance Fast Facts.

Why is USAID’s obligation and spent data separate from the Department of State’s?

The Department of State and USAID’s foreign assistance budgets are requested and appropriated jointly. The funds for the Department of State and USAID are then disaggregated at the obligated and spent phases of the funding process when the appropriated funds are allocated to agency-specific programs and activities.

Where does the USAID data come from?

The source of information for populating ForeignAssistance.gov data fields is USAID’s accounting system of record, used in headquarters and missions overseas. As with all accounting systems, credits and debits are posted daily.

Why are there negative numbers in some of the obligation and disbursement records?

  • Individual records: For an individual record, negative obligations or disbursements result when adjustments are made in the current quarter to a previous transaction. Most commonly, a negative obligation represents a downward adjustment to an obligation made in a prior period. The downward adjustment or “de-obligation” may result from a correction to an erroneous posting made in a prior period or the cancelation of a prior award. A negative disbursement is commonly a refund or reimbursement of unused funds, or a correction to an erroneous posting made in a prior period.
  • Aggregate records: Since reports are made quarterly to ForeignAssistance.gov, negative obligations for a country, sector or operating unit occur when negative adjustments (“de-obligations”) are larger than positive new obligations made in the quarter. Likewise, negative disbursements arise when more money is collected or reimbursed than was paid out in actual disbursements.

Definitions of obligations and disbursements can be found on the website here.

What is Recipient Geographical Area?

The Recipient Geographical Area (RGA) data field identifies the country or geopolitical entity that is receiving the development or humanitarian assistance.

What funds are included in the geographic category “Worldwide?”

Funds are classified as "worldwide" when, at the time of obligation, it is not possible to identify the ultimate recipient of the development or humanitarian assistance. An example is bulk commodity procurements of items that will later be distributed to multiple locations. In addition, general operating expenses (i.e. direct hire salaries and benefits) and administrative funds (i.e. office supplies) are designated as "worldwide."

A deobligation is defined as a “downward adjustment of previously recorded obligations”. GAO Glossary of Terms Used in the Federal Budget Process

Explore USAID Distributions on a Map