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ForeignAssistance.gov was updated on October 19, 2018. Click here to explore the update details.

Department of State

Agency Overview

Note on Data Availability: The Department of State is implementing a new foreign assistance reporting solution along with updates to Department managed systems used to maintain foreign assistance data in accordance with recommendations produced by the Foreign Assistance Data Review (FADR). ForeignAssistance.gov will update the Department of State data sets as they become available.

For more information on FADR, please see the Phase 1 Foreign Assistance Data Review Findings Report and the Phase 2 Data Element Index.

As the lead U.S. foreign affairs agency, the Department of State has over 265 diplomatic locations around the world, including embassies, consulates, and missions to international organizations. The Department also maintains diplomatic relations with most countries in the world, as well as with many international organizations.

The Secretary of State is the President's principal advisor on foreign policy and the person chiefly responsible for representing the United States abroad. The primary goal of the Secretary of State and the Department of State is to shape a freer, more secure, and more prosperous world through formulating and implementing the President's foreign policy, while supporting and protecting American interests abroad.

The Department of State's role in providing foreign assistance spans a broad range of sectors working in nations around the world, from mitigating the spread of infectious diseases, responding to humanitarian crises, and countering transnational threats including terrorism, drug trafficking, and nuclear proliferation. The Department is responsible for promoting peace and stability in areas of vital interest to America, and helping developing nations establish stable economic environments.

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Department of State Data

U.S. government agencies are adding data to ForeignAssistance.gov quarterly to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016. Each agency is required by law to report at FY2015 as the minimum base year.

Planned Funding By Fiscal Year | DoS and USAID

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Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | DoS

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Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | DoS

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Transaction Data | DoS

Transaction data represents every individual financial record in an agency’s accounting system for program work with implementing partners and administrative expenses. Transaction data is the most granular form of financial data. Each data record - or financial transaction - contains qualitative data fields, including descriptive titles, vendor names, and location, along with the financial data. Thus, transaction data is called Disaggregated data as it disaggregates financial data into its most basic form.

The data shown above in the planned, obligated, and spent tabs represents transaction data aggregated at a higher level of analysis (by country and sector only), thus this data is called Aggregated data.

The table below displays every applicable award within each agency’s accounting system. An award may consist of multiple financial transactions. In these instances, the table displays the award’s aggregated sum of its individual transactions. Data from the table can be downloaded by selecting each individual award. The downloadable report disaggregates award data into individual transactions. If an award has multiple transactions, the downloadable report will generate lines of data for each transaction.

For additional information related to data definitions and classifications, please refer to the Glossary of Terms or the FAQs.

This data set will continue to be updated in accordance with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin 12-01.

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Frequently Asked Questions | DoS

What is the Department of State?

As the lead U.S. foreign affairs agency, the Department of State has over 265 diplomatic locations around the world, including embassies, consulates, and missions to international organizations. The Department also maintains diplomatic relations with most countries in the world, as well as with many international organizations.

The Secretary of State, the ranking member of the Cabinet and fourth in line of presidential succession, is the President's principal advisor on foreign policy and the person chiefly responsible for representing the United States abroad. The primary goal of the Secretary of State and the Department of State is to shape a freer, more secure, and more prosperous world through formulating and implementing the President's foreign policy, while supporting and protecting American interests abroad.

When was the Department of State created?

On September 15, 1789, Congress passed "An Act to provide for the safe keeping of the Acts, Records, and Seal of the United States, and for other purposes." This law changed the name of the Department of Foreign Affairs to the Department of State because certain domestic duties were assigned to the agency. These included:

  • Receipt, publication, distribution, and preservation of the laws of the United States;
  • Preparation, sealing, and recording of the commissions of Presidential appointees;
  • Preparation and authentication of copies of records and authentication of copies under the Department's seal;
  • Custody of the Great Seal of the United States;
  • Custody of the records of the former Secretary of the Continental Congress, except for those of the Treasury and War Departments.

Other domestic duties that the Department of State was responsible for at various times included issuance of patents on inventions, publication of the census returns, management of the mint, control of copyrights, and regulation of immigration. Most domestic functions have been transferred to other agencies. Those that remain in the Department of State are: storage and use of the Great Seal, performance of protocol functions for the White House, drafting of certain Presidential proclamations, and replies to public inquiries.

Please visit the Department of State's Office of the Historian page for more information.

Are all PEPFAR funds captured within Department of State’s planned, obligated and spent data?

No. The majority of the PEPFAR budget is accounted for within the DOS/USAID planned data; however, reporting of expenditures is the responsibility of the implementing agent, which often times is under the purview of another U.S. government agency.

It appears that a large percentage of DOS funds are attributed to “Worldwide” rather than a specific country or region. What does “Worldwide” represent?

The Department of State's foreign assistance efforts span across the globe. Because of this global reach, its programs often impact more than one specific country, particularly for regional or functional bureaus. Over time, this area of reporting will improve.

It appears that a large percentage of DOS funds are attributed to “Multi-Sector” rather than a specific sector. What does “Multi-Sector” represent?

The Department of State developed common definitions to describe and account for foreign assistance programs. Sometimes these program areas are directed to serve multiple purposes and do not fit into one specific sector framework. Over time, this area of reporting will improve.

Why aren’t all functions performed abroad considered foreign assistance activities, and thereby managed with foreign assistance funds?

Activities of the Department of State abroad are wide-ranging and include offering services whose beneficiaries are U.S. citizens, such renewing passports, as well as diplomatic or operational activities, which are not considered foreign assistance.

Does the data represent all of the foreign assistance funding appropriated to the Department of State?

No, it does not. During the Department of State's budget process, certain foreign assistance programs, such as PEPFAR, are appropriated to the Department of State and then transferred to other agencies to be implemented by those agencies.

Why do some of the data fields say “Redacted”?

Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and information considered sensitive according to the six Principled Exceptions enumerated in OMB Bulletin 12-01 have been redacted and the information replaced with the word “Redacted.”

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